# Other Methods

# debug()

Chaining this method to any query will print all the executed SQL to console.

See knex documentation (opens new window)

# Return value
Type Description
QueryBuilder this query builder for chaining.

# toKnexQuery()

knexQueryBuilder = queryBuilder.toKnexQuery();

Compiles the query into a knex query and returns the knex query builder instance.

Some objection queries, like when withGraphFetched is used, actually execute multiple queries. In these cases, the query builer of the first query is returned

In some rare cases the knex query cannot be built synchronously. In these cases you will get a clear error message. These cases can be handled by calling the optional initialize method once before the failing toKnexQuery method is called.

const { initialize } = require('objection');

await initialize([Person, Pet, Movie, SomeOtherModelClass]);

# for()

queryBuilder = queryBuilder.for(relationOwner);

This method can only be used in conjunction with the static relatedQuery method. See the relatedQuery documentation on how to use it.

This method takes one argument (the owner(s) of the relation) and it can have any of the following types:

  • A single identifier (can be composite)
  • An array of identifiers (can be composite)
  • A QueryBuilder
  • A model instance.
  • An array of model instances.

# context()

queryBuilder = queryBuilder.context(queryContext);

Sets/gets the query context.

Some query builder methods create more than one query. The query context is an object that is shared with all queries started by a query builder.

The context is also passed to $beforeInsert, $afterInsert, $beforeUpdate, $afterUpdate, $beforeDelete, $afterDelete and $afterFind calls that the query creates.

In addition to properties added using this method the query context object always has a transaction property that holds the active transaction. If there is no active transaction the transaction property contains the normal knex instance. In both cases the value can be passed anywhere where a transaction object can be passed so you never need to check for the existence of the transaction property.

This method merges the given object with the current context. You can use clearContext to clear the context if needed.

See the methods runBefore, onBuild and runAfter for more information about the hooks.

# Arguments
Argument Type Description
queryContext Object The query context object
# Return value
Type Description
QueryBuilder this query builder for chaining.
# Examples

You can set the context like this:

await Person.query().context({ something: 'hello' });

and access the context like this:

const context = builder.context();

You can set any data to the context object. You can also register QueryBuilder lifecycle methods for all queries that share the context:

Person.query().context({
  runBefore(result, builder) {
    return result;
  },
  runAfter(result, builder) {
    return result;
  },
  onBuild(builder) {}
});

For example the withGraphFetched method causes multiple queries to be executed from a single query builder. If you wanted to make all of them use the same schema you could write this:

Person.query()
  .withGraphFetched('[movies, children.movies]')
  .context({
    onBuild(builder) {
      builder.withSchema('someSchema');
    }
  });

# clearContext()

queryBuilder = queryBuilder.clearContext();

Replaces the current context with an empty object.

# Return value
Type Description
QueryBuilder this query builder for chaining.

# mergeContext()

WARNING

Deprecated! Will be removed in version 3.0. Use context instead.

v1 documentation (opens new window)

# tableNameFor()

const tableName = queryBuilder.tableNameFor(modelClass);

Returns the table name for a given model class in the query. Usually the table name can be fetched through Model.tableName but if the source table has been changed for example using the QueryBuilder#table method tableNameFor will return the correct value.

# Arguments
Argument Type Description
modelClass function A model class.
# Return value
Type Description
string The source table (or view) name for modelClass.

# tableRefFor()

const tableRef = queryBuilder.tableRefFor(modelClass);

Returns the name that should be used to refer to the modelClass's table in the query. Usually a table can be referred to using its name, but tableRefFor can return a different value for example in case an alias has been given.

# Arguments
Argument Type Description
modelClass function A model class.
# Return value
Type Description
string The name that should be used to refer to a table in the query.

# reject()

queryBuilder = queryBuilder.reject(reason);

Skips the database query and "fakes" an error result.

# Arguments
Argument Type Description
reason The rejection reason
# Return value
Type Description
QueryBuilder this query builder for chaining.

# resolve()

queryBuilder = queryBuilder.resolve(value);

Skips the database query and "fakes" a result.

# Arguments
Argument Type Description
value The resolve value
# Return value
Type Description
QueryBuilder this query builder for chaining.

# isExecutable()

const isExecutable = queryBuilder.isExecutable();

Returns false if this query will never be executed.

This may be true in multiple cases:

  1. The query is explicitly resolved or rejected using the resolve or reject methods.
  2. The query starts a different query when it is executed.
# Return value
Type Description
boolean false if the query will never be executed.

# isFind()

const isFind = queryBuilder.isFind();

Returns true if the query is read-only.

# Return value
Type Description
boolean true if the query is read-only.

# isInsert()

const isInsert = queryBuilder.isInsert();

Returns true if the query performs an insert operation.

# Return value
Type Description
boolean true if the query performs an insert operation.

# isUpdate()

const isUpdate = queryBuilder.isUpdate();

Returns true if the query performs an update or patch operation.

# Return value
Type Description
boolean true if the query performs an update or patch operation.

# isDelete()

const isDelete = queryBuilder.isDelete();

Returns true if the query performs a delete operation.

# Return value
Type Description
boolean true if the query performs a delete operation.

# isRelate()

const isRelate = queryBuilder.isRelate();

Returns true if the query performs a relate operation.

# Return value
Type Description
boolean true if the query performs a relate operation.

# isUnrelate()

const isUnrelate = queryBuilder.isUnrelate();

Returns true if the query performs an unrelate operation.

# Return value
Type Description
boolean true if the query performs an unrelate operation.

# isInternal()

const isInternal = queryBuilder.isInternal();

Returns true for internal "helper" queries that are not directly part of the operation being executed. For example the select queries performed by upsertGraph to get the current state of the graph are internal queries.

# Return value
Type Description
boolean true if the query performs an internal helper operation.

# hasWheres()

const hasWheres = queryBuilder.hasWheres();

Returns true if the query contains where statements.

# Return value
Type Description
boolean true if the query contains where statements.

# hasSelects()

const hasSelects = queryBuilder.hasSelects();

Returns true if the query contains any specific select staments, such as: 'select', 'columns', 'column', 'distinct', 'count', 'countDistinct', 'min', 'max', 'sum', 'sumDistinct', 'avg', 'avgDistinct'

# Return value
Type Description
boolean true if the query contains any specific select staments.

# hasEager()

WARNING

Deprecated! Will be removed in version 3.0. Use hasWithGraph instead.

v1 documentation (opens new window)

# hasWithGraph()

const hasWithGraph = queryBuilder.hasWithGraph();

Returns true if withGraphFetched or withGraphJoined has been called for the query.

# Return value
Type Description
boolean true if withGraphFetched or withGraphJoined has been called for the query.

# has()

const has = queryBuilder.has(selector);
console.log(
  Person.query()
    .range(0, 4)
    .has('range')
);

Returns true if the query defines an operation that matches the given selector.

# Arguments
Argument Type Description
selector string | RegExp A name or regular expression to match all defined operations against.
# Return value
Type Description
boolean true if the query defines an operation that matches the given selector.

# clear()

queryBuilder = queryBuilder.clear(selector);

Removes all operations in the query that match the given selector.

# Arguments
Argument Type Description
selector string | regexp A name or regular expression to match all operations that are to be removed against.
# Return value
Type Description
QueryBuilder this query builder for chaining.
# Examples
console.log(
  Person.query()
    .orderBy('firstName')
    .clear('orderBy')
    .has('orderBy')
);

# runBefore()

queryBuilder = queryBuilder.runBefore(runBefore);

Registers a function to be called before just the database query when the builder is executed. Multiple functions can be chained like then methods of a promise.

# Arguments
Argument Type Description
runBefore function(result, QueryBuilder) The function to be executed. This function can be async. Note that it needs to return the result used for further processing in the chain of calls.
# Return value
Type Description
QueryBuilder this query builder for chaining.
# Examples
const query = Person.query();

query
  .runBefore(async result => {
    console.log('hello 1');

    await Promise.delay(10);

    console.log('hello 2');
    return result;
  })
  .runBefore(result => {
    console.log('hello 3');
    return result;
  });

await query;
// --> hello 1
// --> hello 2
// --> hello 3

# onBuild()

queryBuilder = queryBuilder.onBuild(onBuild);

Functions registered with this method are called each time the query is built into an SQL string. This method is ran after runBefore methods but before runAfter methods.

If you need to modify the SQL query at query build time, this is the place to do it. You shouldn't modify the query in any of the run methods.

Unlike the run methods (runAfter, runBefore etc.) these must be synchronous. Also you should not register any run methods from these. You should only call the query building methods of the builder provided as a parameter.

# Arguments
Argument Type Description
onBuild function(QueryBuilder) The synchronous function to be executed.
# Return value
Type Description
QueryBuilder this query builder for chaining.
# Eamples
const query = Person.query();

query
  .onBuild(builder => {
    builder.where('id', 1);
  })
  .onBuild(builder => {
    builder.orWhere('id', 2);
  });

# onBuildKnex()

queryBuilder = queryBuilder.onBuildKnex(onBuildKnex);

Functions registered with this method are called each time the query is built into an SQL string. This method is ran after onBuild methods but before runAfter methods.

If you need to modify the SQL query at query build time, this is the place to do it in addition to onBuild. The only difference between onBuildKnex and onBuild is that in onBuild you can modify the objection's query builder. In onBuildKnex the objection builder has been compiled into a knex query builder and any modifications to the objection builder will be ignored.

Unlike the run methods (runAfter, runBefore etc.) these must be synchronous. Also you should not register any run methods from these. You should only call the query building methods of the knexBuilder provided as a parameter.

WARNING

You should never call any query building (or any other mutating) method on the objectionBuilder in this function. If you do, those calls will get ignored. At this point the query builder has been compiled into a knex query builder and you should only modify that. You can call non mutating methods like hasSelects, hasWheres etc. on the objection builder.

# Arguments
Argument Type Description
onBuildKnex function(KnexQueryBuilderQueryBuilder) The function to be executed.
# Return value
Type Description
QueryBuilder this query builder for chaining.
# Examples
const query = Person.query();

query.onBuildKnex((knexBuilder, objectionBuilder) => {
  knexBuilder.where('id', 1);
});

# runAfter()

queryBuilder = queryBuilder.runAfter(runAfter);

Registers a function to be called when the builder is executed.

These functions are executed as the last thing before any promise handlers registered using the then method. Multiple functions can be chained like then methods of a promise.

# Arguments
Argument Type Description
runAfter function(result, QueryBuilder) The function to be executed. This function can be async. Note that it needs to return the result used for further processing in the chain of calls.
# Return value
Type Description
QueryBuilder this query builder for chaining.
# Examples
const query = Person.query();

query
  .runAfter(async (models, queryBuilder) => {
    return models;
  })
  .runAfter(async (models, queryBuilder) => {
    models.push(Person.fromJson({ firstName: 'Jennifer' }));
    return models;
  });

const models = await query;

# onError()

queryBuilder = queryBuilder.onError(onError);

Registers an error handler. Just like catch but doesn't execute the query.

# Arguments
Argument Type Description
onError function(Error, QueryBuilder) The function to be executed on error.
# Return value
Type Description
QueryBuilder this query builder for chaining.
# Examples
const query = Person.query();

query
  .onError(async (error, queryBuilder) => {
    // Handle `SomeError` but let other errors go through.
    if (error instanceof SomeError) {
      // This will cause the query to be resolved with an object
      // instead of throwing an error.
      return { error: 'some error occurred' };
    } else {
      return Promise.reject(error);
    }
  })
  .where('age', '>', 30);

# castTo()

queryBuilder = queryBuilder.castTo(ModelClass);
queryBuilder = queryBuilder.castTo<SomeType>();

Sets the model class of the result rows or if no arguments are provided, simply casts the result type to the provided type.

# Return value
Type Description
ModelClass The model class of the result rows.
# Return value
Type Description
QueryBuilder this query builder for chaining.
# Examples

The following example creates a query through Person, joins a bunch of relations, selects only the related Animal's columns and returns the results as Animal instances instead of Person instances.

const animals = await Person.query()
  .joinRelated('children.children.pets')
  .select('children:children:pets.*')
  .castTo(Animal);

If you don't provide any arguments for the method, but provide a generic type argument, the result is not changed but its typescript type is cast to the given generic type.

interface Named {
  name: string;
}

const result = await Person.query()
  .select('firstName as name')
  .castTo<Named[]>();

console.log(result[0].name);

# modelClass()

const modelClass = queryBuilder.modelClass();

Gets the Model subclass this builder is bound to.

# Return value
Type Description
Model The Model subclass this builder is bound to

# skipUndefined()

queryBuilder = queryBuilder.skipUndefined();

If this method is called for a builder then undefined values passed to the query builder methods don't cause an exception but are ignored instead.

For example the following query will return all Person rows if req.query.firstName is undefined.

# Return value
Type Description
QueryBuilder this query builder for chaining
# Examples
Person.query()
  .skipUndefined()
  .where('firstName', req.query.firstName);

# transacting()

queryBuilder = queryBuilder.transacting(transaction);

Sets the transaction for a query.

# Arguments
Argument Type Description
transaction object A transaction object
# Return value
Type Description
QueryBuilder this query builder for chaining

# clone()

const clone = queryBuilder.clone();

Create a clone of this builder.

Type Description
QueryBuilder Clone of the query builder

# execute()

const promise = queryBuilder.execute();

Executes the query and returns a Promise.

# Return value
Type Description
Promise Promise the will be resolved with the result of the query.

# then()

const promise = queryBuilder.then(successHandler, errorHandler);

Executes the query and returns a Promise.

# Arguments
Argument Type Default Description
successHandler function identity Promise success handler
errorHandler function identity Promise error handler
# Return value
Type Description
Promise Promise the will be resolved with the result of the query.

# catch()

const promise = queryBuilder.catch(errorHandler);

Executes the query and calls catch(errorHandler) for the returned promise.

# Arguments
Argument Type Default Description
errorHandler function identity Error handler
# Return value
Type Description
Promise Promise the will be resolved with the result of the query.

# bind()

const promise = queryBuilder.bind(returnValue);

Executes the query and calls bind(context) for the returned promise.

# Arguments
Argument Type Default Description
context undefined Bind context
# Return value
Type Description
Promise Promise the will be resolved with the result of the query.

# resultSize()

const promise = queryBuilder.resultSize();

Returns the amount of rows the current query would produce without limit and offset applied. Note that this executes a copy of the query and returns a Promise.

This method is often more convenient than count which returns an array of objects instead a single number.

# Return value
Type Description
Promise<number> Promise the will be resolved with the result size.
# Examples
const query = Person.query().where('age', '>', 20);

const [total, models] = await Promise.all([
  query.resultSize(),
  query.offset(100).limit(50)
]);

# page()

queryBuilder = queryBuilder.page(page, pageSize);
const result = await Person.query()
  .where('age', '>', 20)
  .page(5, 100);

console.log(result.results.length); // --> 100
console.log(result.total); // --> 3341

Two queries are performed by this method: the actual query and a query to get the total count.

Mysql has the SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS option and FOUND_ROWS() function that can be used to calculate the result size, but according to my tests and the interwebs (opens new window) the performance is significantly worse than just executing a separate count query.

Postgresql has window functions that can be used to get the total count like this select count(*) over () as total. The problem with this is that if the result set is empty, we don't get the total count either. (If someone can figure out a way around this, a PR is very welcome).

# Arguments
Argument Type Description
page number The index of the page to return. The index of the first page is 0.
pageSize number The page size
# Return value
Type Description
QueryBuilder this query builder for chaining

# range()

queryBuilder = queryBuilder.range(start, end);

Only returns the given range of results.

Two queries are performed by this method: the actual query and a query to get the total count.

Mysql has the SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS option and FOUND_ROWS() function that can be used to calculate the result size, but according to my tests and the interwebs (opens new window) the performance is significantly worse than just executing a separate count query.

Postgresql has window functions that can be used to get the total count like this select count(*) over () as total. The problem with this is that if the result set is empty, we don't get the total count either. (If someone can figure out a way around this, a PR is very welcome).

# Arguments
Argument Type Description
start number The index of the first result (inclusive)
end number The index of the last result (inclusive)
# Return value
Type Description
QueryBuilder this query builder for chaining
# Examples
const result = await Person.query()
  .where('age', '>', 20)
  .range(0, 100);

console.log(result.results.length); // --> 101
console.log(result.total); // --> 3341

range can be called without arguments if you want to specify the limit and offset explicitly:

const result = await Person.query()
  .where('age', '>', 20)
  .limit(10)
  .range();

console.log(result.results.length); // --> 101
console.log(result.total); // --> 3341

# pluck()

WARNING

Deprecated! Will be removed in version 3.0.

v1 documentation (opens new window)

# first()

queryBuilder = queryBuilder.first();

If the result is an array, selects the first item.

NOTE: This doesn't add limit 1 to the query by default. You can override the Model.useLimitInFirst property to change this behaviour.

Also see findById and findOne shorthand methods.

# Return value
Type Description
QueryBuilder this query builder for chaining
# Examples
const firstPerson = await Person.query().first();

console.log(firstPerson.age);

# throwIfNotFound()

queryBuilder = queryBuilder.throwIfNotFound(data);

Causes a Model.NotFoundError to be thrown if the query result is empty.

You can replace Model.NotFoundError with your own error by implementing the static Model.createNotFoundError(ctx) method.

# Arguments
Argument Type Description
data object optional object with custom data may contain any property such as message, type. The object is returned in the error thrown under the data property. A special case is for the optional message property. This is used to set the title of the error. These extra properties can be leveraged in the error handling middleware
# Return value
Type Description
QueryBuilder this query builder for chaining
# Examples
try {
  await Language.query()
    .where('name', 'Java')
    .andWhere('isModern', true)
    .throwIfNotFound({
      message: `Custom message returned`,
      type: `Custom type`
    });
} catch (err) {
  // No results found.
  console.log(err instanceof Language.NotFoundError); // --> true
}

# traverse()

WARNING

Deprecated! Will be removed in version 3.0.

v1 documentation (opens new window)

# pick()

WARNING

Deprecated! Will be removed in version 3.0.

v1 documentation (opens new window)

# omit()

WARNING

Deprecated! Will be removed in version 3.0.

v1 documentation (opens new window)

# timeout()

See knex documentation (opens new window)

# Return value
Type Description
QueryBuilder this query builder for chaining.

# connection()

See knex documentation (opens new window)

# Return value
Type Description
QueryBuilder this query builder for chaining.

# modify()

Works like knex's modify (opens new window) function but in addition you can specify a modifier by providing modifier names.

See the modifier recipe for examples of the things you can do with modifiers.

# Arguments
Argument Type Description
modifier function(QueryBuilder) | string | string[] The modify callback function, receiving the builder as its first argument, followed by the optional arguments. If a string or an array of strings is provided, the corresponding modifier is executed instead.
*arguments ...any The optional arguments passed to the modify function
# Examples

The first argument can be a name of a model modifier. The rest of the arguments are passed as arguments for the modifier.

Person.query().modify('someModifier', 'foo', 1);

You can also pass an array of modifier names:

Person.query().modify(['someModifier', 'someOtherModifier'], 'foo', 1);

The first argument can be a function:

function modifierFunc(query, arg1, arg2) {
  query.where(arg1, arg2);
}

Person.query().modify(modifierFunc, 'foo', 1);
# Return value
Type Description
QueryBuilder this query builder for chaining.

# applyModifier()

WARNING

Deprecated! Will be removed in version 3.0. Use modify instead.

v1 documentation (opens new window)

Applies modifiers to the query builder.

# Arguments
Argument Type Description
modifier string The name of the modifier, as found in modifier.
*arguments When providing multiple arguments, all provided modifiers will be applied.
# Return value
Type Description
QueryBuilder this query builder for chaining.

# applyFilter()

WARNING

Deprecated! Will be removed in version 3.0. Use modify instead.

v1 documentation (opens new window)

An alias for applyModifier

# modifiers()

Registers modifiers for the query.

You can call this method without arguments to get the currently registered modifiers.

See the modifier recipe for more info and examples.

# Return value
Type Description
QueryBuilder this query builder for chaining.
# Examples
const people = await Person.query()
  .modifiers({
    selectFields: query => query.select('id', 'name'),
    // In the following modifier, `filterGender` is a modifier
    // registered in Person.modifiers object. Query modifiers
    // can be used to bind arguments to model modifiers like this.
    filterWomen: query => query.modify('filterGender', 'female')
  })
  .modify('selectFields')
  .withGraphFetched('children(selectFields, filterWomen)');

You can get the currently registered modifiers by calling the method without arguments.

const modifiers = query.modifiers();